Theodosis Karageorgakis
Theodosis Karageorgakis Educraft.tech
These are articles are products of my work and beliefs and therefore upon reading them you are free to share them, use them in any way you like as long as you cite me as the author. Thank you for your understanding

 

This week’s elearning heroes challenge is about Using Tooltips as Microinteractions in E-Learning. Tooltips are a popular microinteraction that can enhance your learner’s course experience. Tooltips can be text-based or include multimedia, hyperlinks, and performance support material. In this week's challenge, we're looking for creative ways to use tooltips in e-learning. So here is my week's submission:

http://educraft.tech/portfolio/challenge265/story.html

 

Tutorial

This course aimed to teach young EFL students about Body Parts. It is divided into 4 segments that are actually 4 different pictures that jump into different slides. At the learn section all the knowledge can be found for the student. The problem was that I didn’t want to bombard youngsters with information and overwhelm the slide with text. So I came with the following solution

Project-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered methodology that encourages students to learn and apply knowledge and skills through an engaging experience and  active exploration of real-world problems (Dewey, 1997). Students learn about a subject by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to a complex question, challenge, or problem (Markham, 2011). PBL contrasts with traditional teaching since it doesn’t portray a linear knowledge path but instead poses questions and problems, thus enabling the motion of learning by doing.

What is Informal Learning? What is the difference between Informal and Formal Learning? How can Informal Learning be applied to eLearning scenarios?

Informal learning is any learning that is organized differently compared to the formal learning that happens inside classroom, either online or regular, because it has no pre-determined and clear objectives in terms of knowledge or learning outcomes.

We have reached a point in our lives that would seem impossible to previous generations, thanks to the technological improvements that have bettered our daily lives. We have also seen the rise of EdTech around the world during the last few years however most of those solutions are still lacking in most schools around the globe. It really disappoints me the fact that today’s teachers still use realia, photocopies, and plain books to teach Gen Z students, the so called “Digital natives”, who were born with a smartphone on one hand and a mouse on the other. A variety of issues are to blame for this situation.

You have used your favorite authoring tool to make your SCORM course, and it actually looks really nice as a standalone object. But is it enough? Will it look the same way when you upload it on Moodle? What needs to be done in order for it to be as user-friendly as possible?

Moving into a technologically dependent society, it is becoming clear that video games are everywhere around us. They are so deeply rooted in human culture that more than 155 million US citizens choose them as a form of entertainment (ESA, 2015). Although it is a difficult task to accurately identify the extent of their penetration into society, given their role in entertainment and other areas, efforts have been made in recent years to develop them as an educational tool that will enhance conventional teaching and learning. in line with modern pedagogical approaches. (Foster, Shah & Duvall, 2015). But why has this effort not been successful? Is it their very nature that prevents them from being integrated into the classroom, or are other factors that make integration difficult?

To be able to meet the needs of our knowledge-based society, the modern educator must constantly learn and evolve. Continuous training is necessary to improve the quality of teaching. Various studies have shown that the appropriate pedagogical approaches and regular teacher training influence students' success more than other factors such as the number of students in the classroom or the teacher's previously gained experience. A well-informed educator is able to help his students learn and improve their performance in various disciplines. Given that teachers tend to teach in the way they are taught, there is a need for a complete restructuring of how they are trained.

But what needs to be taken into account in order for teacher training programs to succeed?

Motivation is a critical factor in the success of learning. When motivation weakens, learning ceases (Gee, 2003). Planning activities that emphasize students' motivation are able to offer ways to bridge their lack of interest, increase their involvement and ultimately foster learning in the subject area. How can the ARCS motivation model help instructional designers create more fun and engaging learning activities for the learners? 

Those who design and develop educational applications have undoubtedly come across the term "Storyboard", a vague and obscure term. So what is a Storyboard?

Ask a group of course designers we know how to make e-learning more engaging by using images, videos, and animations more effectively. The visuals and interactive elements are really good places to start. But there’s another element that’s often overlooked: audio.

E-learning audio is more than voice-over narration. Audio includes audio interviews, ambient sounds, natural sound effects, and background music. Used effectively, these can help draw in learners, focus their attention, and fuel their imaginations. And that's what E-learning heroes community weekly challenge is all about!

Virtual reality has attracted the interest of the research community due to the endless possibilities itoffers in the educational arena. Although a wide range of applications already exists, further researchis required to establish effective practices for a fruitful classroom implementation. This quantitativeresearch of a sample of 37 primary school students explores the educational affordances and students’perceptions of virtual reality systems as supportive tools for teaching English as a foreign language.

It is well known that gamification is an engaging technique that enables the creation of a deeper bond between the user and the product. Why does this happen? How does Neuroscience explain this connection? Read the article below by Juliette Denny to learn more.

Despite the fact that in comparative development corporate eLearning has grown by a stunning 900% since 2000, multiple training programs are still offered in an old-fashioned way of delivering eLearning courses. This leads to limited engagement and in some cases to the failure of the whole training programme.Those are the most common issues that eLearning programs face today.

Video Version of the Article

 Nowadays countless activities involve us in a process of collecting points. You may get points for buying regularly from your local coffee shop, your neighborhood supermarket or even by travelling with the same airlines. Those are just a few common examples of gamification in the everyday life for most of us.
Gaming is the use of game mechanics in non-playable situations (Detering, Dixon, Khaled, & Nacke, 2011). This way, the game-related elements are used to directly improve the user experience and enhance one’s interest, encouraging greater product loyalty.

What is microlearning? Can it improve students' engagement? Is it more advantageous compared to traditional ways of delivering content? Should microlearning be used in every single course?